List of Alchemists

These pages are in the reversed order they were created in. For a chronological order in which the alchemists lived see the navigation pane on the right.

  • Johann Joachim Becher

    Johann Joachim Becher formulated the Phlogiston theory of combustion, and it lasted over a century. He also transmuted gold out of the mud of the Danube.
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  • Johann Rudolf Glauber

    Johann Rudolf Glauber was perhaps the first chemical engineer. He was known for his “Glauber’s Salt” and paved the way for gold ruby glass. Listen to our podcast on him here: Glauber’s Salt Gold Ruby Glass First Chemical Engineer
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  • Faust

    I got the inside scoop on the Faust house in Wittenberg, but let’s back up and go over the legend and also the oldest alchemical vessels found in Europe.
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  • Giovanni Agostino Panteo

    Giovanni Panteo (also Joannes Pantheus or Pantaura) really differentiated between Alchemy and Archimy Giovanni Agostino Panteo also Pantheo, Joannes Pantheus was an Italian alchemist -.and priest of the 16th century in Venice in 1519 he published the book Ars transmutationis metallicae,both with the permission of the Pope and of the Council ofTen in Venice, and even […]
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  • Cornelis Drebbel

    Even in Golden Age of Alchemy, Cornelis Drebbel stands alone as a sort of Ben Franklin or Emmett Brown character. He created the first submarine, red dye, and was famous for him continuous mobile machines that landed him in the courts of the likes of James I of England and Rudolf II of the Holy […]
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  • Elizabeth I

    Elizabeth I of England, the last of the Tudors, is more than an interesting footnote in the history of alchemy.
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  • Richard and Isabella Ingalese

    A fun legend of Alchemists from around the turn of the century in California.
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  • Heinrich Khunrath

    Heinrich Khunrath was a physician, hermetic philosopher, and alchemist. He was also a sort of bridge between John Dee’s philosophy and Rosicrucianism. Our podcast on him here: Khunrath interpreted transmutation itself as a mystical process occurring within the adept’s soul. (The Jewish Alchemists)
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  • Christina of Sweden

    Christina of Sweden converted to Catholicism and turned to alchemy. Christina (Swedish: Kristina Augusta; 18 December [O.S. 8 December] 1626 – 19 April 1689), later adopted the name Christina Alexandra, was Queen regnant of Sweden from 1633 to 1654, She used the titles of Queen of Swedes, Goths, and Vandals, Grand Princess of Finland, and Duchess of […]
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  • Count of St. Germain

    So many fantastic stories of the Count of St. Germain. Who was he and how long did he live? Even folks like Voltaire and Casanova had something to say about this man that travelled in royal circles around Europe. This was a listener request. Here’s our podcast on him: Count of St. Germain Unfortunately we […]
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  • Bernard Trevisan

    We take a look at another great influencing character on the golden age of alchemy from the 14th or 15th century. Bernard Trevisan (Bernard of Treviso, Bernardus Trevisanus) refers to one or more Italian alchemists. These are often confused, or more accurately the name may refer to a shadowy figure or figures. Bernard of Trévisan […]
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  • Alexander von Suchten

    Alexander von Suchten was more of a court physician and chemist than alchemist, but as one of the people who’s works Benedictus Figulus published, I thought it would be interesting to take a closer look at this nobleman. Benedictus Figulus was his publisher (we did a podcast on that guy) This is a pretty interesting alchemist, and […]
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  • Edmund Dickinson

    Edmund Dickinson was alchemist and court physician to Charles II and James II. LifeMove to englandPrague and Rudolf IIBack to opticsWorksChemistry[edit]SubmarineScarlet dyeEngravingsHonorsOxfordOne of the letters:Royal SocietyRoyal PhysicianFrom the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography:The worck of Dickinson. Edmund Dickinson or Dickenson (1624–1707) was an English royal physician and alchemist, author of a syncretic philosophical system. He was son […]
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  • Khalid ibn Yazid (Calid)

    Our podcast on him: Khalid (known as Calid in the West), in addition to being a prince of the Umayyad caliphate, was also interested in alchemy and is responsible for translating many works into arabic. Calid – Khalid Ibn Yazid Summarized Greek knowledge to date. This is more of a myth than reality, but this […]
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  • Maslama al-Majriti

    Our podcast on him: Maslama al-Majriti is a chemist (and much more) in Moorish Spain from the 10th century. More info to come…
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  • Samuel Danforth

    Another look at a colonial American alchemist. <iframe width=”400″ height=”400″ src=”http://embed.acast.com/historyofalchemy/samuel-danforth” scrolling=”no” frameborder=”0″ style=”border:none;overflow:hidden;”></iframe>
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  • Fulcanelli and Caseliet

    Our podcast on him: <iframe width=”400″ height=”400″ src=”http://embed.acast.com/historyofalchemy/fulcanelli-and-caseliet” scrolling=”no” frameborder=”0″ style=”border:none;overflow:hidden;”></iframe> We take a look at a mysterious 20th century French alchemist: Fulcanelli and his student, Caseliet.
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  • Johann Conrad Dippel

    Our episode on him:   Johann Conrad Dippel is the man behind Frankenstein, Prussian Blue, and an energy drink. Johann Conrad Dippel (August 10, 1673 – April 25, 1734) was a German pietist theologian, alchemist and physician. This guy is basically the real-life Dr. Frankenstein, so hold onto your seats. but was he really? was […]
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  • Johann Friedrich Böttger

    Johann Friedrich Böttger is credited with bringing porcelain to Europe. At the time porcelain was as valuable as gold, so no surprise that it took an alchemist to do it.
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  • Marie Curie

    Our podcast on her: Marie Curie isn’t really an alchemist, but she did show that “transmutation” does happen in nature. Normally this is out of the scope of The History of Alchemy Podcast, but we took the opportunity to compare modern atomic theory to the one of alchemists. To make up for us going out […]
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  • Paul of Taranto

    Listen to our podcast episode here: Paul of Taranto may have been one of the the “Pseudo-Gebers” and had an interesting theory of the composition of metals (basically mercury and sulphur) that would become canon to alchemical theory. It’s interesting for us to see a monk in the 13th century sitting in a lab going […]
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  • Baru Urbigerus

    Our podcast episode on Urbigerus: We take a look at one of the alchemical ciphers to understanding Baru Urbigerus’ works. Baro or Baru Urbigerus was a seventeenth-century writer on alchemy. He is known for his Aphorismi Urbigerani (1690) This collection of 100aphorisms claims to set out completely the theory of the alchemical work, the preparation […]
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  • Peter Bonus

    Listen to our podcast on Peter Bonus here:   Peter Bonus wrote on the debate on whether alchemy is natural or supernatural.
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  • Eirenaeus Philalethes (George Starkey)

    Our first look at a New World alchemist. We look at Eirenaeus Philalethes and the person behind the name, George Starkey. He’s one of the giants whose shoulders Isaac Newton stood on.
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  • Hennig Brand

    Here’s our podcast on Brand: <iframe width=”400″ height=”400″ src=”http://embed.acast.com/historyofalchemy/hennig-brand” scrolling=”no” frameborder=”0″ style=”border:none;overflow:hidden;”></iframe> Today’s episode originally aired as part of the History Podcasters Network as a part of a collage show. Hennig Brand is the discoverer of Phosphorus, and we talk about his alchemical experiments in getting to his discovery.
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  • Robert Fludd

    Paracelsian physician, hermeticist, early modern neo-platonist, theurgist, rosicrucian apologist, and golden-age alchemist. We’ve covered all the basics so you’re ready for this guy.
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  • Zosimos of Panopolis

    Here’s my podcast on him: Zosimos of Panopolis was an Egyptian or Greek alchemist and Gnostic mystic again from around 300 AD. You could argue he’s the first real alchemist writer we can go to today. He mainly mentions older, more ancient alchemists in his writings, but his writings are the oldest ones to survive […]
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  • Tycho Brahe

    The podcast on Tycho Brahe and Johannes Keppler for more on Kepler, see Johannes Kepler Tycho Brahe, (14 December 1546 – 24 October 1601) The notes for the podcast are some 12 pages (the podcast was 90 mins) so it’ll take me a bit to clean them up for this page. Science Most precise measurements of […]
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  • Thomas Aquinas

    Will definitely be a podcast. Why not subscribe and wait? St. Thomas Aquinas (1225–1274) Science Occult Thaumaturgy Influenced by Aristotle Al-Ghazali Albertus Magnus Influenced
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  • Bishop Synesius of Cyrene

    Our podcast episode on him: A commentator on Pseudo-Democritus and Bishop in what is now Libya. Also see Neo-Platonism Interesting snippets: the earliest known reference to a hydrometer Bishop, even though he was neo-platonic Synesius (c. 373 – c. 414), was a Greek bishop of Ptolemais (Modern day Libya) after 410, Life Synesius was born of wealthy […]
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  • Rudolf II of Hapsburg

    My podcast episode on my all-time favorite Holy Roman Emperor Holy Roman Emperor Rudolf II had an alchemist’s lab of his own and was the patron of several other alchemists in Magical Prague.
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  • Roger Bacon

    Doctor Mirabilis and Franciscan friar, Roger Bacon… father of science? Have a listen for his take on the philosopher’s stone and alchemical processes. Roger Bacon, O.F.M. (c. 1214–1294) (scholastic accolade Doctor Mirabilis, meaning “wonderful teacher”) didn’t really study nature through empirical methods like Al-Ghazali and Albertus Magnus.. more through book (scholastic tradition) inspired by the works […]
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  • Ramon Llull

    All-around interesting character that had an influence on the likes of Martin Luther and Gottfried Leibniz. Listen to our Podcast episode on Llull here: Died 1315 LifeMove to englandPrague and Rudolf IIBack to opticsWorksChemistry[edit]SubmarineScarlet dyeEngravingsHonorsOxfordOne of the letters:Royal SocietyRoyal PhysicianFrom the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography:The worck of Dickinson.DefinitionScience:Occult:Influenced by:ConversionJoin the “Religions of the Books”Christian […]
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  • Pseudo-Geber

    See Jabir ibn Hayyan (the original Geber) Listen to our episode on Jabir ibn Hayyan (Geber) here: The first practical alchemist and possibly the most influential alchemist of all time. We also break down Geber vs Pseudo-Geber.
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  • Pseudo-Democritus

    To not confuse Democritus and Pseudo-Democritus (who lived some 600 years apart) we break down the difference between the two and go into the works of Pseudo-Democritus, a 2nd century Alchemist. Here’s our podcast on him: To talk about Pseudo-Democritus, let’s first discuss Democritus, so that you can easily tell the difference when you hear […]
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  • Pico della Mirandola

    Pico della Mirandola with the patronage of the Medici helped bring in the Renaissance (if there is such a thing) Occult Neoplatonism Hermeticism Christian Kabbalah – believed that this was proved Christianity. Influenced by Hermes Trismegistus Marcilio Ficino Influenced
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  • Paracelsus

    Listen to my podcast episode on Paracelsus: Paracelsus (born Philippus Aureolus Theophrastus Bombastus von Hohenheim, 1493 –1541) was a German-Swiss “Paracelsus”, meaning “equal to or greater than Celsus”, refers to the Roman encyclopedist Aulus Cornelius Celsus from the 1st century, known for his tract on medicine. …this is indicative of his overbearing ego that would get […]
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  • Ostanes

    A mysterious person, (or –more likely– multiple people with the same name) from Persia. Sometimes called the ‘father of alchemy.’ His supposed contributions include first mentioning the elixir of life, the philosopher’s stone, being in Xerxes’ court, and a teacher of Alexander the Great, teaching Democritus, and a Magi in the line of Zoroaster. Listen to […]
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  • Nicolas Flamel

    Listen to our podcast episode on him here: A book seller that got a larger than life reputation centuries after his death. If the stories are to be believed he’s still around. Nicolas Flamel I’ll bet some waiting for this one for a while. If people can name one Alchemist, it’s probably him. So let’s […]
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  • Miriam the Jewess

    Miriam the Jewess (sometime in the 1st to 4th century AD). Maria the Jewess (or Maria Prophetissima, Maria Prophetissa, Mary Prophetissa, Miriam the Prophetess) is a figure appearing first in the works of the Gnostic Christian writer Zosimos of Panopolis. Zosimus’ sources are not clear, and may be developed from Miriam, sister of Moses, but on […]
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  • Michael Sendivogius

    The podcast episode on Michal Sedziwoj (Michael Sendivogius) Michal Sedziwoj (1566–1636) Michał Sędziwój (Michael Sendivogius, Sędzimir) alchemist, philosopher, and medical doctor. His noble family that was part of the Clan of Ostoja. – interesting clan. they “chose” their members more than a true bloodline. He studied in Vienna, Altdorf, Leipzig and at Cambridge. His acquaintances included […]
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  • John Dee

    John Dee (13 July 1527 – 1608 or 1609) One of the most famous Alchemists of the 16th Century. Spent some time in Prague. While John Dee wore many hats, he is probably most famous to being an advisor to Elizabeth I, partner of Edward Kelley, and his angel conjuring. Have a listen for much more on him!  
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  • Johannes Kepler

    The podcast on Johannes Kepler and Tycho Brahe: For more on Brahe, see Tycho Brahe LifeMove to englandPrague and Rudolf IIBack to opticsWorksChemistry[edit]SubmarineScarlet dyeEngravingsHonorsOxfordOne of the letters:Royal SocietyRoyal PhysicianFrom the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography:The worck of Dickinson.DefinitionScience:Occult:Influenced by:ConversionJoin the “Religions of the Books”Christian CabalaMartyr’s deathLegacyMathematics, statistics, and classificationModern fictionBibliography: Influenced:HoroscopesProphecy of wallenstein“Musical Harmony”Kepler’s nova:The dreamMother witchcraft […]
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  • Isaac Newton

    Our podcast on Newton’s alchemy: To see Isaac Newton as just a figure in the Scientific Revolution is not understanding him at all. To get the whole picture of who he was and what he was after one needs to look at Isaac Newton the alchemist. Science Occult Occult contributions Translated the Emerald Tablet Influenced by: […]
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  • Hermes Trismegistus

    My Podcast on this topic: Combination of Greek god Hermes and Egyptian god Thoth gods of writing and magic (and more) Thoth in particular was the god of Magic, Writing, Astrology and Alchemy carried souls to the afterlife (Psychopomps) Hermes is equivalent to the Roman God Mercury.. who also has a strong importance in alchemy […]
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  • Henry Cornelius Agrippa

    Henry Cornelius Agrippa, (1486 – 1535) Science Occult Neoplatonism Christian Kabbalah Hermeticism. He believed Hermes Trismegistus to be a contemporary of Moses and prophet of Christianity. Influenced by: Johann Reuchlin Influenced Albrecht Dürer Other Was a Christian (as most Christian Cabalists) and wrote about occult sciences and the folly of them. Sources Wikipedia Yates
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  • Giovanni (Mercurio) da Corregio

    Podcast about him here: Giovanni da Correggio, also Giovanni Mercurio is a little out there. Great story. The time frame is around 1450. Hard to say exactly. He was the bastard son of Antonio da Correggio, who lived until 1474, and his pupil, Lodovico Lazzarelli lived from 1447 to 1500. Anyway, story time. Told to […]
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  • Gilles de Rais

    Listen to our podcast episode here: More infamously known as serial killer of children, we discuss his role in alchemy, its charlatans and black magic. Gilles de Montmorency-Laval (also known as Gilles de Retz) lived from 1404–1440, Baron de Rais, was a Breton knight, a leader in the French army in the hundred years war. […]
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  • Jabir ibn Hayyan (Geber)

    Listen to our episode no Jabir ibn Hayyan (Geber) here: The first practical alchemist and possibly the most influential alchemist of all time. We also break down Geber vs Pseudo-Geber. Abu Mūsā Jābir ibn Hayyān (al-Barigi / al-Azdi / al-Kufi / al-Tusi / al-Sufi), But we’ll refer to him simply as Geber, (c.721–c.815) was born […]
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  • Ge Hong

    A great Chinese alchemist who may be the first to mention mosaic gold. He used gold for medicine and was a real innovator of gold. Besides that he wrote on nearly everything. His writing were considered Taoist canon for a long time. Our podcast on him: Ge Hong (Chinese: 葛洪; pinyin: Gě Hóng) lived from […]
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  • Francesco Giorgi

    Francesco Giorgi, (1466–1540) a Franciscan friar and Christian Cabalist. Science Occult Christian Kabbalah. He believed that Cabala was a way to prove Christianity. Influenced by: Kabbalah Ramon Llull Influenced John Dee (at least possessed his books) Possibly influenced Rosicrusians Trivia Is said to have helped Henry VIII with the Jewish Law in Venice in order […]
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  • Edward Kelley

    Edward Kelley One of the most famous Alchemists of the 16th Century. Spent some time in Prague. Listen to our podcast on him here: John Dee and Kelley are some of the more interesting characters we took a look at. Between making gold, talking to angels, and even wife-swapping, there’s a lot to cover. John Dee has his […]
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  • Benedictus Figulus

    Benedictus Figulus, or Benedikt Heffner (1467 – after 1619) listen to our podcast on him here: This guy wasn’t that easy to research. I only found stuff in German. Go ahead and look him up, we’ll wait… all German? Well we translated stuff just for you, so this guy might be new. We hope you […]
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  • Basil Valentine

    Basil Valentine, or Basilius Benedictus (possibly 1565 to 1614) who may have been the publisher Johann Thölde listen to our podcast on him here: Valentine’s true identity can’t be known for sure, but my money’s on Johann Thölde, and we talk a little about both. As far as we know for the first time in the […]
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  • Arnold of Villanova

    Podcast about him here: The man who may have discovered carbon monoxide and general anaesthesia… and maybe moonshine. Arnaldus de Villa Nova (also called Arnau de Vilanova, Arnaldus Villanovanus, Arnaud de Ville-Neuve or Arnaldus de Villanueva, was an alchemist, astrologer and physician. Very interesting person to look at since he’s mentioned so often by later […]
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  • Albertus Magnus

    My Podcast on this topic: Albertus Magnus, (11/3/1206 – November 15, 1280), also known as Albert the Great and Albert of Cologne, is a Catholic saint and was a Dominican monk. “Doctor Universalis” Dominican Friar, Bishop and saint. Patron saint of natural sciences Honored by the Catholic Church as a Doctor of the Church (one […]
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  • Al-Razi (Rhazes)

    Listen to our podcast to hear about another legendary polymath in medicine, philosophy, and chemistry that broke the mold. Our episode here: Interview with Peter Adamson, Professor at LMU in Munich and host of the History of Philsophy without any Gaps Podcast here: Muhammad ibn Zakariyā Rāzī (865 – 925), known as Rhazes or Rasis […]
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  • Al-Ghazali

    My Podcast on this topic: Abū Ḥāmid Muḥammad ibn Muḥammad al-Ghazālī, born 448 AH (c. 1058 – 1111) also known as Algazel at the time in Europe. Born in Khorosan Province in Persia and became a muslim alchemist. Single most important muslim after mohammed Also known as “The man who saved islam” About Al-Ghazali Alchemy […]
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  • Agathodaimon

    Here’s my podcast on him: Agathodaimon was an alchemist that lived around (c. 300) in Roman Egypt. Works: Anepigraphos Supposedly from the 3rd century, but all we have are medieval fragments of this work. It describes elements and minerals. A way to produce silver …and poison “fiery poison” possibly arsenic trioxide, or possibly amphoteric oxide. […]
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